Botanical by  Basilius Besler

These will have occasional light age toning normally to the page edge though after 200 years they are doing well

Antirrhinum Sylvestris, Antirrhinum Flore albo, Antirrhinum Flora

Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has a chewed right edge plus a repair to the base left corner resulting in title loss. light show trhough of text,  plus slight central crease as in many This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed    £455 inc delivery



 



I. Leontopetalon. II. Polium Alpinum flore luteo. III. Bellis minor flore coeruleo.

Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed  . CONDITION ISSUES Toned, a few blemishes and the paper type indicates an earlier edition in cheaper continental frame.  £385 inc delivery UK cheaper collected  


 


  Comfrey/ Symphytum maius flore purpurco;


Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg,  PRE 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed    Older more muted colour + early paper type  £625 inc delivery



Caryophyllus maior /Carnations

Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, PRE  1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed   Older more muted colour + early paper type  so from a pre 1713 3dition £625 inc delivery

Hotminum Syriacum , Horminium Hortense

Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, PRE  1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed   Older more muted colour + early paper type  so from a pre 1713 3dition £625 inc delivery


1.Nepeta Germanica, 2. Menta Felina


Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, PRE 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed    Older more muted colour + early paper type  so from a pre 1713 3dition £625 inc delivery




Coronopus, Limonium Syriacum, Calamentha Angustifolijs / Sea Lavender


Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, PRE  1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed    Older more muted colour + early paper type  so from a pre 1713 edition £625 inc delivery


I. Myagrum Hortense Monospermon. II. Sinapi album.


Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed    £625 inc delivery Two copies of this one with much older colour


I. Myagrum Hortense Monospermon. II. Sinapi album. by Basilius Besler, Date pre : 1713
Older more muted colour + early paper type  £625 inc delivery


Calamintha Montana vulgaris , Calamintha Montana Stantior


Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm.  ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed  Older more muted colour + early paper type  £625 inc delivery



Erica minor flore albo, Lychnis Coronaria, by Basilius Besler, Date pre 1713
Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm.  **Older more muted colour + early paper type  This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale plus printers crease (paper was not flat when printed) . This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed    £625 inc delivery


Conyza media/ Aster Atticus minor flore coeruleo/ Aster atticus maior Flore coeruleo:


Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed    £585 inc delivery Close printed right edge




Marrubium vulgare, Pl. 231


Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed  £455 inc delivery




 Arbor ludae;


Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed  £560 inc delivery



  Althae Vulgaris
Copper-engraved print, with older hand colour, from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest  pictorial records of the flowers grown in the garden of  Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg.  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraved print, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. .   Althae Vulgaris Unframed Print with old Ccolour by Besler from the Rare 1613 De-luxe edition . This is the only edition guaranteed to the correct year of publication ... see below.. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. ** This is on the earlier type of rag paper Besler used and cannot be mixed with later ones on white paper as they glare unless in another room** Ask and I can take pics of a selection to compare paper states  £785 

The first edition was published in two issues: one with descriptive text printed on the verso of each plate and one without the text; in a few copies of the latter issue the text was printed on separate sheets and interleaved with the plates. As Barker observes, the issue without text backing the plates was undoubtedly intended to be coloured by hand; the versos were left blank, to ensure that no shadow of the printed text could detract from the botanical image. It is significant that many of the deluxe copies have no descriptive text at all. The first edition was limited to 300 copies, each of which carried a premium price. While uncoloured copies were available for 35 florins (rising to 48), coloured copies cost 500 florins. Herzog August of Braunschweig exclaimed in disbelief over the price of a coloured copy, but acquired one nonetheless, once he was assured that he had indeed understood the price correctly.

 

The Birch Tree

  Antique copperplate engraving from Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest Trees by John Evelyn, published in 1786. This influential volume was originally published in 1664 John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a life-long public servant and an avid gardener. These are untinted as printed, with engravings by J Miller £15 each edge tear to image edge tear to plate left


The White Beam Tree

  Antique copperplate engraving from Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest Trees by John Evelyn, published in 1786. This influential volume was originally published in 1664 John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a life-long public servant and an avid gardener. These are untinted as printed, with engravings by J Miller £18 each edge tear to plate right


The Common Elm Tree

  Antique copperplate engraving from Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest Trees by John Evelyn, published in 1786. This influential volume was originally published in 1664 John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a life-long public servant and an avid gardener. These are untinted as printed, with engravings by J Miller £18 each


Martynia

  Antique copperplate engraving from Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest Trees by John Evelyn, published in 1786. This influential volume was originally published in 1664 John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a life-long public servant and an avid gardener. These are untinted as printed, with engravings by J Miller £18 each


 


Tea Tree
 Hand tinted aquatint plate from the book Interesting Selections from Animated Nature with Illustrative Scenery Designed and Engraved by William Daniell (London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, [ca. 1807-1812],  22 x 16 cm plus borders etc  This contained 120 aquatint plates tree images included on botanic pages £30 inc delivery



Fir Tree
 Hand tinted aquatint plate from the book Interesting Selections from Animated Nature with Illustrative Scenery Designed and Engraved by William Daniell (London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, [ca. 1807-1812], This contained 120 aquatint plates tree images included on botanic pages £30 inc delivery x 2



Breadfruit Tree
 Hand tinted aquatint plate from the book Interesting Selections from Animated Nature with Illustrative Scenery Designed and Engraved by William Daniell (London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, [ca. 1807-1812],  This contained 120 aquatint plates tree images included on botanic pages £30 inc delivery



Cedar Tree
 Hand tinted aquatint plate from the book Interesting Selections from Animated Nature with Illustrative Scenery Designed and Engraved by William Daniell (London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, [ca. 1807-1812],  This contained 120 aquatint plates tree images included on botanic pages £30 inc delivery



Details de la Liane femelle du Chili. Dessine par Prevost, oncle. Grave par PP. Choffard. L. Aubert scripsit. Atlas du Voyage de la Perouse, no. 9. (Paris: L'Imprimerie de la Republique, An V, dated  1797) the French government (Louis XVI)  assembled a high class group of scientists around Captain Jean-Francois de Galaup de la Perouse (1741 - 1788). La Perouse sailed with two ships, the “Astrolabe" and the “Boussole" 1785 into the Pacific to match the earlier Cook expedition. The FIRST drawing of the chili plant  Published in Paris, 1798 .£185 inc large plate page 59 x 45+ cm
 



Struthiola Ciliata. Fringed-leaved Struthiola.

1802. Etching with original  handcolour  image is full sheet size on 27 x 20 cm .  With accompanying text sheet giving botanical information, where the specimen was found etc. Botanical details are included along the lower edge of the plate. Plate 139 from "The Botanist's Repository, Comprising Colour'd Engravings of New and Rare Plants Only" by H.C. Andrews /Andrews, Henry C. (illus).Unmounted £40 inc delivery



The Great bale Oak at Welbeck
By Jacob George Strutt,  from Sylva Britannica Or Portraits of Forest Trees Distinguished For Their Antiquity, Magnitude, Or Beauty.  Published for the Author by Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, London: not positive as to edition so either 1822 or 1838, 14.5 x 12.5 inches  Jacob George Strutt, painter and etcher, studied in London, and was a contributor to the Royal Academy and British Institution at intervals between 1819 and 1858. For a few years he practiced portrait-painting, but from 1824 to 1831 exhibited studies of forest scenery, and he is now best known by two sets of etchings which he published at this period `Sylva Britannica, or portraits of Forest Trees distinguished for their Antiquity' (1822; reissued, in 1838), and `Delicia Sylvarum, or grand and romantic Forest Scenery in England and Scotland' (1828). About 1831 Strutt went abroad, and, after residing for a time at Lausanne, settled in Rome. In 1851 he returned to England, but was not active after 1858. £95 tinted
Payment

Payment is via Paypal or simply  post a cheque or transfer details on request. Prices post inclusive over £40


Info
    HEATONS 2-3 HIGH STREET TISBURY SALISBURY WILTSHIRE SP3 6PS



  • The Shop

    The shop is open on request any day I can see you  by either emailing  me  in advance or ringing the home number 01747870048 and I should be in

    S