Botanical Besler, Merian etc  .


Besler, Merian..Barnard's Trees 1868 + Strutt Sylvana, Munting etc




Portulaca Sativa
Portulaca Sativa, PL. 286, measures 21.25" x 16.75" shows  evidence of verso page text. Illustrated on this engraving are plants commonly known as Winter Savory, Purslane and Garden Savory.

Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. A magnificent plate from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest and most famous works in the field. The Hortus Eystettensis is a pictorial record of the flowers grown in the greatest German garden of its time, that of Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. A visitor, Philipp Hainhofer, in 1611 marvelled at the eight gardens, each containing 'flowers from a different country; they varied in the beds and flowers.'  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; the huge nature of the task was clear to Besler and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed  £585 inc delivery



Spartium hispanicum
Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. A magnificent plate from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest and most famous works in the field. The Hortus Eystettensis is a pictorial record of the flowers grown in the greatest German garden of its time, that of Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. A visitor, Philipp Hainhofer, in 1611 marvelled at the eight gardens, each containing 'flowers from a different country; they varied in the beds and flowers.'  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; the huge nature of the task was clear to Besler and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 £685 inc delivery




Cervicaria
hortensis flox caeruleo Glockenblumen


Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. A magnificent plate from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest and most famous works in the field. The Hortus Eystettensis is a pictorial record of the flowers grown in the greatest German garden of its time, that of Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. A visitor, Philipp Hainhofer, in 1611 marvelled at the eight gardens, each containing 'flowers from a different country; they varied in the beds and flowers.'  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; the huge nature of the task was clear to Besler and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed  £585 inc delivery




Quinquefolium
palustre. II. Quinquefolium maius. III. Tormentilla

Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. A magnificent plate from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest and most famous works in the field. The Hortus Eystettensis is a pictorial record of the flowers grown in the greatest German garden of its time, that of Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. A visitor, Philipp Hainhofer, in 1611 marvelled at the eight gardens, each containing 'flowers from a different country; they varied in the beds and flowers.'  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; the huge nature of the task was clear to Besler and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 £685 inc delivery



White Mustard and Myagrum
Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. A magnificent plate from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest and most famous works in the field. The Hortus Eystettensis is a pictorial record of the flowers grown in the greatest German garden of its time, that of Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. A visitor, Philipp Hainhofer, in 1611 marvelled at the eight gardens, each containing 'flowers from a different country; they varied in the beds and flowers.'  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; the huge nature of the task was clear to Besler and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 £685 inc delivery very light show though better paper




Melilotus Germanica flore luteo, Galega flore cinereo, Galega flore albo.

Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. A magnificent plate from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest and most famous works in the field. The Hortus Eystettensis is a pictorial record of the flowers grown in the greatest German garden of its time, that of Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. A visitor, Philipp Hainhofer, in 1611 marvelled at the eight gardens, each containing 'flowers from a different country; they varied in the beds and flowers.'  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; the huge nature of the task was clear to Besler and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 £685 inc delivery




Ageratum. II. Coniza Palustris. III. Coniza minor.


Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. A magnificent plate from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest and most famous works in the field. The Hortus Eystettensis is a pictorial record of the flowers grown in the greatest German garden of its time, that of Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. A visitor, Philipp Hainhofer, in 1611 marvelled at the eight gardens, each containing 'flowers from a different country; they varied in the beds and flowers.'  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; the huge nature of the task was clear to Besler and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 £685 inc delivery



Sea holly] Eryngium Pannonicum latifolium; [White hyssop] Hyssopus flore albo; [Pink hyssop] Hyssopus flore rubro; [Blue hyssop] Hyssopus flore coeruleo.


Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. A magnificent plate from "Hortus Eystettensis", one of the earliest and most famous works in the field. The Hortus Eystettensis is a pictorial record of the flowers grown in the greatest German garden of its time, that of Prince Bishop of Eichstatt, Johann Conrad von Gemmingen. The garden was begun by Joachim Camerarius in 1596 and, after his death in 1598, completed by Basil Besler, a pharmacist from Nuremberg. A visitor, Philipp Hainhofer, in 1611 marvelled at the eight gardens, each containing 'flowers from a different country; they varied in the beds and flowers.'  It is  one of the earliest records of flowers from a specific, documented garden. Besler was asked to complete the work by Gemmingen in 1606; the huge nature of the task was clear to Besler and he enlisted the help of his younger brother Hieronymus and Ludwig Jungermann, a nephew of Camerarius. Printing the Hortus may have begun as early as 1607. Drawings were made in situ and from specimens sent by the Bishop to Nuremberg; the Bishop reported to Hainhofer that he had boxes of fresh flowers sent every week to Besler at Nuremberg for sketching. A team of at least 10 engravers were employed to translate the drawings to copperplates. The gardens, along with most of the town of Eichstatt, were destroyed by the invading Swedish troops under Herzog Bernhard von Weimar in 1633-4, although they were partially restored by later bishops. Many of the original drawings survive in the University Library, Erlangen. Copper-engraving, with fine hand colour. Dimensions: 540 by 447mm. . published Nuremburg, 1713 ** This has some show through of the type to verso due to a heavy handed printer which is common in early wood and copper block printing on larger scale. This makes it cheaper and is less obvious when framed  £585 inc delivery



Convolvulus non Convolvulus Angustifolius
Antique Folio Copper Plate  first Published 1696 Leyden Utrecht for Naauwkeurige Beschryving Der Aardgewassen by Abraham Munting but these are from the 1702 edition , Plants are often larger than life, with decorative scrolls presenting their Latin names.  Abraham Munting, born in 1626 in Groningen, was a Dutch physician, professor, & internationally renowned botanist. He became director of the Hortus Botanicus at Groningen at the age of 32 and served in that position until his death in 1683. Not as some list the Phytographia Curiosa. which is later £165 inc delivery



Pulmonaria Maculosa Maxima
Antique Folio Copper Plate  first Published 1696 Leyden Utrecht for Naauwkeurige Beschryving Der Aardgewassen by Abraham Munting but these are from the 1702 edition , Plants are often larger than life, with decorative scrolls presenting their Latin names.  Abraham Munting, born in 1626 in Groningen, was a Dutch physician, professor, & internationally renowned botanist. He became director of the Hortus Botanicus at Groningen at the age of 32 and served in that position until his death in 1683. Not as some list the Phytographia Curiosa. which is later £165 inc



Lapathum Sativum Antiquorum
Antique Folio Copper Plate  first Published 1696 Leyden Utrecht for Naauwkeurige Beschryving Der Aardgewassen by Abraham Munting but these are from the 1702 edition , Plants are often larger than life, with decorative scrolls presenting their Latin names.  Abraham Munting, born in 1626 in Groningen, was a Dutch physician, professor, & internationally renowned botanist. He became director of the Hortus Botanicus at Groningen at the age of 32 and served in that position until his death in 1683. Not as some list the Phytographia Curiosa. which is later £165 inc



  Lapathum hortense.
Antique Folio Copper Plate  first Published 1696 Leyden Utrecht for Naauwkeurige Beschryving Der Aardgewassen by Abraham Munting but these are from the 1702 edition , Plants are often larger than life, with decorative scrolls presenting their Latin names.  Abraham Munting, born in 1626 in Groningen, was a Dutch physician, professor, & internationally renowned botanist. He became director of the Hortus Botanicus at Groningen at the age of 32 and served in that position until his death in 1683. Not as some list the Phytographia Curiosa. which is later £165 inc



Digitalis Virginiana Angustifolia Spicata
Antique Folio Copper Plate  first Published 1696 Leyden Utrecht for Naauwkeurige Beschryving Der Aardgewassen by Abraham Munting but these are from the 1702 edition , Plants are often larger than life, with decorative scrolls presenting their Latin names.  Abraham Munting, born in 1626 in Groningen, was a Dutch physician, professor, & internationally renowned botanist. He became director of the Hortus Botanicus at Groningen at the age of 32 and served in that position until his death in 1683. Not as some list the Phytographia Curiosa. which is later £165 inc



Dorycnium Dioscordis
Antique Folio Copper Plate  first Published 1696 Leyden Utrecht for Naauwkeurige Beschryving Der Aardgewassen by Abraham Munting but these are from the 1702 edition , Plants are often larger than life, with decorative scrolls presenting their Latin names.  Abraham Munting, born in 1626 in Groningen, was a Dutch physician, professor, & internationally renowned botanist. He became director of the Hortus Botanicus at Groningen at the age of 32 and served in that position until his death in 1683. Not as some list the Phytographia Curiosa. which is later £165 inc


Horminum Boeticum Coronatum
Antique Folio Copper Plate  first Published 1696 Leyden Utrecht for Naauwkeurige Beschryving Der Aardgewassen by Abraham Munting but these are from the 1702 edition , Plants are often larger than life, with decorative scrolls presenting their Latin names.  Abraham Munting, born in 1626 in Groningen, was a Dutch physician, professor, & internationally renowned botanist. He became director of the Hortus Botanicus at Groningen at the age of 32 and served in that position until his death in 1683. Not as some list the Phytographia Curiosa. which is later £165 inc


Geniculata
Antique Folio Copper Plate  first Published 1696 Leyden Utrecht for Naauwkeurige Beschryving Der Aardgewassen by Abraham Munting but these are from the 1702 edition , Plants are often larger than life, with decorative scrolls presenting their Latin names.  Abraham Munting, born in 1626 in Groningen, was a Dutch physician, professor, & internationally renowned botanist. He became director of the Hortus Botanicus at Groningen at the age of 32 and served in that position until his death in 1683. Not as some list the Phytographia Curiosa. which is later £165 inc

 


The Birch Tree

  Antique copperplate engraving from Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest Trees by John Evelyn, published in 1786. This influential volume was originally published in 1664 John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a life-long public servant and an avid gardener. These are untinted as printed, with engravings by J Miller £15 each edge tear to image

The White Beam Tree

  Antique copperplate engraving from Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest Trees by John Evelyn, published in 1786. This influential volume was originally published in 1664 John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a life-long public servant and an avid gardener. These are untinted as printed, with engravings by J Miller £18 each

The Common Elm Tree

  Antique copperplate engraving from Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest Trees by John Evelyn, published in 1786. This influential volume was originally published in 1664 John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a life-long public servant and an avid gardener. These are untinted as printed, with engravings by J Miller £18 each

The Wild Service  Tree

  Antique copperplate engraving from Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest Trees by John Evelyn, published in 1786. This influential volume was originally published in 1664 John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a life-long public servant and an avid gardener. These are untinted as printed, with engravings by J Miller £18 each

 


Tea Tree
 Hand tinted aquatint plate from the book Interesting Selections from Animated Nature with Illustrative Scenery Designed and Engraved by William Daniell (London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, [ca. 1807-1812],  22 x 16 cm plus borders etc  This contained 120 aquatint plates tree images included on botanic pages £30 inc delivery



Fir Tree
 Hand tinted aquatint plate from the book Interesting Selections from Animated Nature with Illustrative Scenery Designed and Engraved by William Daniell (London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, [ca. 1807-1812], This contained 120 aquatint plates tree images included on botanic pages £30 inc delivery x 2



Breadfruit Tree
 Hand tinted aquatint plate from the book Interesting Selections from Animated Nature with Illustrative Scenery Designed and Engraved by William Daniell (London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, [ca. 1807-1812],  This contained 120 aquatint plates tree images included on botanic pages £30 inc delivery



Cedar Tree
 Hand tinted aquatint plate from the book Interesting Selections from Animated Nature with Illustrative Scenery Designed and Engraved by William Daniell (London: T. Cadell and W. Davies, [ca. 1807-1812],  This contained 120 aquatint plates tree images included on botanic pages £30 inc delivery



Details de la Liane femelle du Chili. Dessine par Prevost, oncle. Grave par PP. Choffard. L. Aubert scripsit. Atlas du Voyage de la Perouse, no. 9. (Paris: L'Imprimerie de la Republique, An V, dated  1797) the French government (Louis XVI)  assembled a high class group of scientists around Captain Jean-Francois de Galaup de la Perouse (1741 - 1788). La Perouse sailed with two ships, the “Astrolabe" and the “Boussole" 1785 into the Pacific to match the earlier Cook expedition. The FIRST drawing of the chili plant  Published in Paris, 1798 .£185 inc large plate page 59 x 45+ cm



 Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks.( similar to Morris Houses ),   from a set of 30 large  plates printed by M. & N. Hanhart, some light foxing and mostly marginal creasing, a few small tears, folio,  Published by Winsor & Newton,  1868. So rare can only find one copy sold but as the entire book so possibly a very small print run



The Oak,
 Holme Park Bushey No 12

Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION crease above to edge of image area another chewed margin page edge covered by mount  £75  large folio x 2



Cedars Of Lebanon,
Warwick Castle No 29

Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION crease  to base edge  and right edge out  of image area  £75  large folio


The Juniper,
Forest of Fontainbleau  No 30

Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION creases  to base edge  near title and right edge out  of image area  £75  large folio


The Birch
Forest of Fontainbleau  No 3

Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION creases  to base edge  near title and right edge out  of image area  £75  large folio



The Oak And Birch Contrasted
Dart Meet, Devonshire  No 23
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION folded corner in margin  £75  large folio


The Alder
on the Mole Surrey  No 18
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION folded corner in margin  £75  large folio


The Horse Chestnut
Wooton Church Surrey  No 16
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION folded corner in margin  £75  large folio


The Beech
  Fore walk ,Wooton , Surrey  No 7
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION crease in margin  £75  large folio


The Thorn
Kenilworth Castle  No 15
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION soiling in margin  £75  large folio


The Plane + Horse Chestnut
Guy's Cliff Wawickshire   No 11
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION crease in margin  £75  large folio


The  Elm
Oakley, Surrey  No 1
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION chewed in margin £45


The Wych Elm
Norbury park   No 19
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION chewed in margin £45


The Weeping Willow
Thames  No 24
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITIONtear almost into text at base will mend, tear left edge into image £10 ONLY if posted with another


The Lime
Interlacken Switzerland  No 21
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION edge tears  to base edge  near title and right edge out  of image area  £75  large folio


Walnut , Oberhofen Switzerland  No 17
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION edge tears inm margin/page edge out  of image area  £75  large folio

The Acacia
Schlangenbad, Nassau   No 20
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION folded corner in margin  £75  large folio

The Yew
Druid's Walk, Norbury  No 22
Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION folded corner in margin  £75  large folio




The Spruce Fir
The Wettertanne of the Alps  No 6

Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION  two copies one with water mark  right edge out  of image area  best sent first  £75  large folio



The Elm
Oakley Surrey   No 1

Drawn by GeorgeBarnard  from  Theory and Practice of Landscape Painting in Water-Colours. Illustrated by a series of Twenty-six drawings and diagrams in colours, and numerous woodcuts.:- Trees,  first edition , printed using   Leighton's Chromatic Process (frequently mistaken for chromolithography), printed entirely from woodblocks. CONDITION  soiling creases  to base edge  repaired tears  £35




Struthiola Ciliata. Fringed-leaved Struthiola.

1802. Etching with original  handcolour  image is full sheet size on 27 x 20 cm .  With accompanying text sheet giving botanical information, where the specimen was found etc. Botanical details are included along the lower edge of the plate. Plate 139 from "The Botanist's Repository, Comprising Colour'd Engravings of New and Rare Plants Only" by H.C. Andrews /Andrews, Henry C. (illus).Unmounted £40 inc delivery



The Great bale Oak at Welbeck
By Jacob George Strutt,  from Sylva Britannica Or Portraits of Forest Trees Distinguished For Their Antiquity, Magnitude, Or Beauty.  Published for the Author by Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, London: not positive as to edition so either 1822 or 1838, 14.5 x 12.5 inches  Jacob George Strutt, painter and etcher, studied in London, and was a contributor to the Royal Academy and British Institution at intervals between 1819 and 1858. For a few years he practiced portrait-painting, but from 1824 to 1831 exhibited studies of forest scenery, and he is now best known by two sets of etchings which he published at this period `Sylva Britannica, or portraits of Forest Trees distinguished for their Antiquity' (1822; reissued, in 1838), and `Delicia Sylvarum, or grand and romantic Forest Scenery in England and Scotland' (1828). About 1831 Strutt went abroad, and, after residing for a time at Lausanne, settled in Rome. In 1851 he returned to England, but was not active after 1858. £95 tinted


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