James Gillray 1.

James Gillray

Background information from The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] 1830. This page is all from this earlier edition He was born in Chelsea. His father, native of Lanark, was as a soldier, losing an arm at the Battle of Fontenoy, and was admitted, first as an inmate, and afterwards as an outdoor pensioner, to Chelsea Hospital. Gillray started his working life at learning letter-engraving. This employment,being boring, he travelled for a time with a company of strolling players. He returned to London as a student in the Royal Academy, supporting himself by engraving, and probably issuing a number of caricatures under fictitious names. His caricatures are almost all in etching, some with aquatint, a few using stipple . None can correctly be described as engravings, although this term is often loosely used of them. Paddy on Horseback, which appeared in 1779, is the first caricature which is certainly his. Two caricatures on Rodney's naval victory, issued in 1782, were among the first of the memorable series of his political sketches.
The name of Gillray's publisher and print seller, Miss Hannah Humphrey-whose shop was first at 227 Strand, then in New Bond Street, then in Old Bond Street, and finally in St James's Street-is personally associated with that of the caricaturist himself. Gillray lived with Miss (often called Mrs) Humphrey during most of his working life. He several times thought of marrying her, and that on one occasion the pair were on their way to the church, when Gillray said: "This is a foolish affair, methinks, Miss Humphrey. We live very comfortably together; we had better let well alone." There is no clear evidence, , to support the stories scandalmongers invented about their relationship. Gillray's plates were shown in Humphrey's shop window.His eyesight started failing him, causing him to stop work in 1809. Depressed he turned to drink, and in July 1811 Gillray attempted to kill himself by throwing himself out of attic window above Humphrey's shop. During 1811 he became mad, although he had occasional intervals of sanity, when he did his last work. The approach of madness may have been hastened by his lifestyle. Gillray died on 1 June 1815, and was buried in St James's churchyard, Piccadilly.

A selection of Gillray's cartoons/charicatures appeared in 1818; but the first good edition from the original plates was Thomas McLean's, which was published on quality ragpaper, in 1830. In 1849/1851 Henry George Bohn put out an edition, from the original plates in a handsome elephant folio, the coarser sketches-commonly known as the "Suppressed Plates"-being published in a separate volume. This is on a poorer paper that can suffer from numerous edge tears as paper quality was sacrificed for a lighter weight to take the impressions from an aging plate. . . ie pic may be crisp but unlesss you watch the paper will be too!



L’ENFANT TROUVE. Sample of Roman Charity! or the misfortune of not being born with Marks of “the Talents”
It was currently reported about this time that a basket containing a female infant, with a ticket addressed to the Marchioness of Buckingham, was left at the door of the Marquis of Buckingham in Pall Mall. The Marquisdirected the child to be carefully conveyed to the work house. This is from the later  Bohn 3rd Edition of 1849 to 1851 £85 post inclusive**



The Hopes of the Party
The result which, it was supposed, the deliberations at  the Crown and Anchor portended. Sir Cecil Wray, the opponent of Fox in the Westminster Election of 1784, had now joined the Opposition ; he was accused of limiting his household very strictly in the article of small beer, andthis had been a subject of jokes and caricatures without end at the Westminster Election. The 14th of July was the day of the dinner at Birmingham, in celebration of the anniversary of the French Revolution,  This is from the later  Bohn 3rd Edition of 1849 to 1851 £95



The Pacific Entrance of Earl Wolf.
The Wolf here represented was Sir James Lowthcr, of great celebrity in the history of borough-mongering, and especially in connection with the town of Whitehaven, the place here alluded to. Gillray's caricature refers to a dispute between this nobleman and the town of Whitehaven, in consequence of which his Lordship suspended the working of his coal mines, and the townsmen were thus induced to make an abject submission. It is the subject of Peter Pindar's " Epistle to the Earl of Lonsdale." Peter Pindar, in this and several other poetical effusions, had attacked the Earl with his usual wit and caustic severity. Lord Lonsdale brought an action against him for a libel. Peter was alarmed, and made the most humble submission. Lord Lonsdale consented to stop the proceedings on a promise that he would never again mention him in his writings. This is from the later  Bohn 3rd Edition of 1849 to 1851 £95




Overthrow of the Republican Babelhe Tower of Babel is represented by a vast pile of bundles of documents tied by tricolour ribbon, culminating in the allegations of Mrs. Clarke against the Duke of York. It is being destroyed by the Speaker, Abbot, who swoops down upon it from a cloud with uplifted and irradiated mace, and holding up a long scroll: Justice Triumphant— Decisions of the Rt Honble The House of Commons—Majority against the Evidence of a Prostitute—Majority against the Machinations of Republicans & Levellers—. The tower totters sideways under blasts from the mouths of Canning, Castlereagh, and (below) Perceval, who lean forward from clouds on the left of the design. Between the two clouds appears part of a curving band, on which is a sign of the Zodiac, the Scales, evenly balanced to show that they are an emblem of Justice . The leaders of the 'Republicans' fall headlong from the tower (right) as it topples, and are also struck down by a copious stream of water from the sky inscribed Royal-Water-Spout. Mrs. Clarke receives its full impact. She is astride the shoulders of Wardle who is falling downwards from the summit. Her large muff , inscribed Mrs A. Clarke's Old Conjuring Muff, To be sold to the best Bidder, flies from her hand. In her hair are the serpents of Discord. To her belt of Ingratitude is attached a bag of Plunder. Wardle wears regimentals; in his pocket is a paper: Wardle Private Reas[ons]. Just below him Lord Folkestone is falling; he drops Patriotic Harangues by Fid Fad Folkstone and a large bundle of papers inscribed Motions for Kicking up a Row in the House of Commons. In his pocket are papers: Cobbetts Hints. Just below him is Whitbread who has fallen on a (falling) ladder, breaking it in half; he sprawls across the broken fragment, struck down by one of his own barrels, inscribed Barrel of Mischief. Its frothing contents pour over his head, inscribed Quassia , Cocus Indicus, Opium  the falling barrel-head is Whitbreads Entire Butt  He drops a paper: Essay upon Political Brewing without Malt or Hops, and an open book: Political Divinity by Sam Froth—The Wicked shall be caught in the work of their own Hands.." Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow side margin..***rfom 'The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £115 post inclusive THIS HAS TWO EDGE TEARS ONE IN LEFT MARGIN , ONE RIGHT 
 


'The bear and his leader'

by James Gillray, published by Hannah Humphrey hand-coloured etching, published 19 May 1806 caricature by Gillray, published on the 19th of May, was entitled, " The bear and his leader,"Fox is represented as a bear muzzled and led in a chain by his master, Lord Grenville : he says, " What though I am obliged to dance a bear, a man may be a gentleman for all that ;" Lord Grenville has a cudgel in his hand, inscribed, " Cudgel for disobedient Bears." A paper inscribed, " Rewards for obedient Bears," hangs from his pocket. He calls out, "Don't be afraid of my Bear, Ladies and Gentlemen, I have tamed and muzzled him, and reformed his habits :" " My Bear ever dances to the genteelest of tunes." Lord Sidmouth enacts the part of a blind old fiddler with a wooden leg, and is playing " God save the King " to the dancing of the bear. From his pocket hangs, " Pray remember your poor and old blind Fiddler." Lord Henry Petty, as a monkey, holds the bear's tail with one hand, and a cap in the other, to collect contributions ; he is dancing, at his feet is the ballad, And a begging we will go." One of the bear's feet is on " Sa ira." Behind Lord Sidmouth hangs out a signpost, inscribed "Pro Bono Publico. Superb fine Exhibition at the Bear-Garden, Broad-Bottom Alley. Orpheus charming the Brutes, with a grand accompaniment by Dr. Sangrado." By his side, " Pease Soup, or Bruin's Delight, a Ballet ;" and " Bubble and Squeak, a Duett," an allusion to Lord Grenville's relatives, Sir Watkins William Winn and Mr. Charles Winn, so nick -named. The insinuation intended to be conveyed by Gillray in this print is, that Fox having owed his introduction to office to Lord Grenville, to whom the King had given a carte blanche to form an Administration, was thereby reduced to subordination to that Nobleman. The constitution of the Cabinet, and the measures adopted by the new Ministers, particularly the mode of opening the negotiation for peace with Franco, and the frank and conciliatory spirit in which it was conducted, proved that Fox's genius was in the ascendant. Fox loved to take counsel with his colleagues on terms of equality ; he would not have brooked a superior. Lord Grenville had the good sense to appreciate the value of his alliance. He was the only man of the party who could, at that time, have led the House of Commons with equal success. It redounds to the honour of the three sections which constituted the Cabinet, that they seem to have acted together with mutual confidence, unalloyed by jealousy,,as long as the health of Fox was spared to share in their deliberations ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***rom ' The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £75 post inclusivex


VENUS A LA COQUILLE; OK, THE SWAN-SEA VENUS. March 28th, 1809.

This is said to represent Mrs. Jones, of Swansea, a celebrated whip, frequently seen in Hyde Park, driving a curricle. It is a very correct representation both of her person and costume. One of her attendants is said to have been a particular favourite. Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***from 'The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £75 post inclusive



Venus Attired by the Graces
A satire on some vulgar fashionable of the commencement of the present century pub 1800 . Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***from  the second edition 'The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £75 post inclusive ••




L'Infanterie Francaise en Egypte." - le Genéral l'Asne converted to Ibrahim Bey

March 12th, 1799. It appears that it was found necessary to mount the troops in the Egyptian campaign upon asses, a circumstance which could not fail to furnish subject for satire. It seems doubtful whether the commander, or the animalwhich carries him, is giving the word of command.** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet.***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later  Bohn 3rd Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £85 post  inc short borders to base





The Real Cause of the present HIGH PRICE of PROVISIONS or a View on the Sea Coast of England with French Agents, smuggling away  Supplies for France

In the bitterness of party animosity, it was pretended that the "Whigs assisted the French in obtaining provisions from this country, and that they thus increased the scarcity and consequent dearncss of provisions at home, which was at this time a subject of great discontent throughout the country. Fox, dressed as the Commissioner-General of the French armies, is negociating the purchases, while Erskine attends as his Secretary, and Sheridan and Grey carry the money. The Duke of Bedford is making a good market of his meal ; the Duke of Norfolk brings in a basket of dumplings ; Grafton is driving the live stock to the coast; and Stanhope is the steersman of the boat which is to carry them on ship-board.** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet.***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later  Bohn 3rd Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £85 post  inc shorter  borders to base







320. BRUIN IN HIS BOAT; OR, THE MANAGER IN DISTRESS. June 20th, 1806.

WILBERFORCE. LORD DERBY. LORD STANHOPE. LORD MELVILLE. WH1TBREAD. LORD SIDMOUTH. Lord Melville, habited as a Scottish Thane, is standing on the Rock of Innocence; he is discharging two cannons, one inscribed "Adam" and the other "Plomer" (the names of his Counsel); with these he shatters to pieces the vessel " Impeachment." Whitbread is thrown out of it into the water, and is swimming to save his life. Fox, as " Bruin," is in his boat, standing upon the " Vanity Cooler;" the flag "Vanity" is floating from the mast head, the Reports of the Naval Commissioners are inscribed on the sail. Wilberforce, Lord Stanhope and Lord Derby, as birds of prey, are hovering around. The " BroadBottom Goose Cap" is seen, with Lord Sidmouth's head placed in it. On the left of the print, at the top, is a balance, inscribed " Impartiality." " Integrity" has weighed down "Defamation." In Lord Melville's perspective is " The Rock of Honour," and " Posterity." Hand Coloured. .***from 'The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. Originally published by Hannah Humphrey drawn /etched by James Gillray -Hand Coloured. T larger sheet, narrow top margin..***from 'The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £105 post inclusive edge tear to base will mend before postage shown prior


'The keenest sportsman in Broomswell camp, 1803' (William Tuder?)
Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow margin..***from ' The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £85 post inclusive



Elements of Skateing
Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow margin..***from ' The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £65 post inclusive



479. THE ROYAL LOUNGER. June 26th, 1804.

DUKE Of CLARENCE. The same personage in another point of view. Originally published by Hannah Humphrey drawn /etched by James Gillray Hand Coloured. ***from 'The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £40 post inclusive




199. SHRINE AT ST. ANNE'S HILL. May 26th, 1798.

NICHOLLS. TIEENEY. LOUD LAUDERDALE. DUKE OF BEDFORD. DUKE OF NORFOLK. MARQUIS OF LANSDOWNE. POX. Fox is kneeling before the busts of Robespierre/Egalite, and Buonaparte. A Tablet is placed on the democratic altar, on which is inscribed " Droit De L'homme," a Political Parody on the Decalogue, the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Articles may be taken as a specimen-VI. " Right to Kill;" VII. "Right to commit Adultery; VIII. "Right to Plunder." Nicholls, the Duke of Norfolk, and others, as stated in the above title, are represented as harpies, &c. hovering around.Published by Hannah Humphrey in 1799 by James Gillray ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £75 post inclusive water mark to page edge  sold



376. MARGARET'S GHOST. March 25th, 1791.

MISS GUNNING, MRS. GUNNING, AND MISS MARGARET MINIFIE.Mrs. Gunning was accused of having attempted to bring about a marrige of her daughter with the Marquis of Blandford, son of the Duke of Marlborough, and the subject was much talked and written about in the fashionable world at this time.Gillray has laid the scene of this print in Miss Gunning's bedroom. Miss Gunning is lying ill in bed ; her mother is seated by her bedside. Her aunt, Miss Margaret Minifie is introduced as " Margaret's Grimly Ghost;" her terrific appearance has struck consternation into the fair invalid, and frightened Mrs. Gunning from her propriety; by a sudden start she has overturned a bottle of brandy, placed by her side to soothe her sorrows. Mrs. Gunning says, " I was sitting by the bedside of my smiling-injuredinnocent lambkin, and holding one of the sweet-tender hands of my amiablo-gentle-dovclike cherub, when her aunt came into the room, with a face paler than ashes -'What is the matter, Auntee Peg/ says my chaste, adorable, kind-beneficent-enchanting-heart-feeling-beneficent-paragon of goodness, "What's the matter, Auntee Peg, what makes you put on such a long face V " This absurd accumulation of foolish expressions of fondness is taken almost literally from passages in Mrs. Gunning's letter to the Duke of Argyll. Again," He broke upon us the dishonourable-infamous-impudent-false accusations, and the cruel, most cruel messages that accompanied them, at that moment a vow issued from my torn, my rent, my wounded, my agonized, my suffering heart, and my dear, divine, glorious, arch-angelic angel said," &c. &c. This alludes to General Gunning's accusation of his daughter.ublished by Hannah Humphrey in 1799 by James Gillray ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £45 post inclusive



428.

A CORNER NEAR THE BANK; OR, AN EXAMPLE FOR FATHERS. Sept. 26th, 1796.

This is understood to represent a clerk of the Bank of England, well known in his day, for his attentions to the city frail ones. The scandalmongers of the past have only handed his name down to us as " old P ." £65 post inclusive sold



575. COUNSELLOR 0. P. DEFENDER OF OUR THEATRIC LIBERTIES. December 5th, 1809.

CLIFFORD."Counsellor Clifford," a barrister who was a well known frequenter of the Cider Cellar, was the leader of the celebrated 0. P. riots on the re-opening of Covent Garden Theatre at the end of 1809. He is represented here as the theatrical incendiary. The paper on the ground alludes to an action connected with the O. P. riots, in which the Counsellor obtained a verdict of five pounds damages. £75 post inclusive


A GREAT MAN ON THE TURF ; OR, SIR SOLOMON IN ALL HIS GLORY. July 7th, 1803. 2

DUKE Of BEDFORD.** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £55 post inclusive


243. INDEPENDENCE. June 9th, 1799.

TYRWHITT JONES.

Gillray has put into the mouth of Tyrwhitt Jones this speech:-" I am an independent man, Sir, and I don't care that, who hears me say so ! I don't like wooden shoes ! No, Sir, nor French wooden shoes; no, nor English wooden shoes, neither; and as to the tall gentleman over the way, I can tell him I am no Pizarro ! I'll not hold up the devil's tail to fish for a place, or a pension ! I'm no skulker. No, nor no seceder neither! I'll not keep out of the way, for fear of being told my own. Here's my place, and here I ought to speak. I warrant I'll not sneak into taverns to drink humbug toasts that I am afraid to explain-not I! My motto is, ' Independence and Old England,' and that for all the rest of the world. There-that!-that!-that!"We cannot trace to what speech this alludes. Pizarro was brought out on the 24th of May ; the print is dated June the 9th. The occurrence must, therefore, have taken place in this interval, because he calls Sheridan " Pizarro." There is not the slightest allusion to any attack of this description made upon Sheridan by Tyrwhitt Jones, or any other speaker, reported in Hansard's Debates during the period. The allusion to humbug toasts, &c., is intended to refer to the speeches and toasts at the Whig Club.The collectors of prints call the first impressions of the " March to Finchley" " the Sunday print," because Hogarth by mistake dated it on a Sunday. Gillray has here made a similar mistake. June the 9th, 1799, was on a Sunday.Originally published by Hannah Humphrey drawn /etched by James Gillray Hand Coloured. .***from 'The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £75 post inclusive

 

503. FAT CATTLE. Jan. 16th, 1802.

DUKE OF BEDFORD. An allusion to the obesity of this noble Duke, as well as to his agricultural tastes-he being a great breeder of cattle. Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow margin..***from ' The Genuine Works of James Gillray, engraved by himself. 2 vols. 1830. --Illustrative description of the genuine works of … J. G. [With a prefatory notice subscribed T. M['Lean].] ie Thomas McLean on heavy ragpaper from original plates printed 1830. £85 post inclusive


GUY VAUX.
No date. GEO. III. DUKES Of RICHMOND. FOX. BURKE. KEPPEL. SHELBUENE. DUNNING. This caricature, which is not dated, relates to the intrigues of the Opposition to overthrow Lord North's Administration in 1 782. Fox holds the dark lanthorn in his left hand, and the barrel of gunpowder is under Lord Shelburne's left arm. ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow margin..***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851  sold



287. THE GENIUS OF FRANCE NURSING HER DARLING. November 26th, 1804.

BUONAPARTE.Another of the numerous caricatures published at this time for the purpose of embittering the English people against their great and inveterate enemy. The imperial crown is the plaything after which he is straining.* Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***All shown with the top margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £65 post inclusive


EXIT LIBERTE A LA FRANCOISE! OR, BUONAPARTE CLOSING THE FARCE OF EGALITE AT ST. CLOUD, NEAR PARIS.
 Nov. Wth, 1799. BUONAPARTE. Nov. 9, 1799, an event known in history as the revolution of the 18th Brumaire. The new constitution, in which Buonaparte was chosen first consul, was promulgated on the 13th of December.** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***All shown with the top margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £65
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THE NUPTIAL BOWEE/Nuptual Bower. February 13th, 1797.
PITT. HON. CATHARINE ISABELLA EDEN. FOX, THE EVIL ONE, PEEPING AT THE CHARMS OP EDEN. Whoever is acquainted with the personal character of Mr. Pitt, only from the narrative of his biographers, will conclude that he was cold, stiff, and unbending; "Indocilis privata loqui," incapable of descending from his dignity, and unwilling to indulge in the relaxation of familiar conversation, and the pleasures of domestic life. He is here represented in a more amiable point of view, a successful suitor for the hand of a fair lady and conducting her to " the nuptial bower." " The tattle of the town (says Burke in a letter to Mrs. Crewe, dated Dec. 27, 1796), is of a marriage between a daughter of Lord Auckland and Mr. Pitt, and that our statesman, our premier des hommes, will take his Eve from the Garden of Eden. It is lucky there is no serpent there, though plenty of fruit." (See Burke's Correspondence as published by Earl Fitzwilliam, vol. 4. p. 417). This rumour obtained belief not only among the public, but by his most intimate friends and relatives. ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***All shown with the top margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £65 post inclusive


PREPARING FOR THE GRAND ATTACK;&; OR, A PRIVATE REHEARSAL OF THE CI-DEVANT MINISTRY IN DANGER. Dec. 4 ATION.
 July 10th,1802. JOHN BULL. PITT Sir Francis Burdett receiving instructions in political warfare from the three great Opposition orators of the day. Soon after this period, on the 12th of April, 1802, Burdett brought forward a motion to inquire into the conduct of the late Ministry. It was for this display that he is here supposed to be preparing. ..Journals of tho 21st of September, 1802,..***All shown with the top margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £85 post inclusive x2 slightly differing tint


GENTLE MANNERS, WITH AFFECTIONS MILD, IN WIT A MAN, SIMPLICITY A CHILD. Nov. 4th, 1798. GENERAL MANNERS.
 ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow top margin..***All shown with the top margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £40 post inclusive


NIGHTLY VISITORS AT ST. ANNE'S HILL. Sept. 21st, 1798. FOX. LORD EDWARD FITZGERALD.
 Fox, aroused from his sleep, has started up in his bed, horror-struck at the apparition of Lord Edward Fitzgerald, who thus addresses him : &; " Who first sednc'd my youthful mind from virtue ? Who plannM my trcasim, and who cans'd my death ? Remember poor Lord Edward, and despair I ! !" Fox answers &emdash; " Why dost thou shake thy gory locks at me ? Dear, bravest, worthiest, noblest, best of men ! Thou canst not say I did it." Around his room are seen the headless bodies of Quigley, Shears, &c. The Confessions of Arthur O'Connor are suspended over Fox's head, and " The Plan of the Irish Rebellion" lays by his side. All these are, of course, intended to imply that Fox and the leading members of the Opposition* had been the authors and abettors of the recent Irish Rebellion. Lord Edward Fitzgerald was the fifth son of the first Duke of Leinster, by his wife Emilia Mary, daughter of Charles, second Duke of Richmond ; he was born the 15th here alluded to. Compare the circumstances of the trial and execution of the former with this prediction." After Burke's death, his executors inserted this note in their first edition of his Works, stating that it was approved by Mr. Burke, and illustrated his meaning.*Originally published by Hannah Humphrey in 1806 by James Gillray ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet,.***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders if close cut ***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851  sold


LARGE BOOTS. May 25th, 1800. ME. FRANCO.
A gentleman then well known on the turf, of Jewish descent, which is indicated by the pigs. This was a private plate. ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet, narrow margin..***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £40 post inclusive



PATTERN STAFF. Nov. 3rd, 1797. LORD WEYMOUTH.
Said to be a back view of this Lord. *Originally published by Hannah Humphrey in 1806 by James Gillray ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet,.***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders if close cut ***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 **£40 post inclusive
 


394. A VESTAL OF -93, TRYING ON THE CESTUS OF VENUS. April 29th, 1793.

" Upon her fragrant breast the zone was brac'd; In it was every art, and every charm To win the wisest, and the coldest warm." Engraved from a basso-relievo, lately found upon some fragments of Antiquity. LADY CECILIA JOHNSTON.Lady Henrietta Cecilia (whose maiden name was West), was the daughter of the Earl of Delawarr by his wife, In this print, Gillray has depicted Lady Cecilia Johnston as a Vestal of -93, that is, of 1793. She is in a sitting postnre, with Ovid's Art of Love in her pocket. Cupid is encircling her with the Cestus of Venus, (a pad) which one of the attendant Loves is adjusting to her person, and Cupid is preparing to fasten it on, while another of the Loves holds up a mirror, in which the delighted Lady Cecilia surveys herself with transports of delight. The arrows are falling out of Cupid's quiver, and his bow with * Of the count of Lincoln.
an arrow in it lies below him. On the left of the print is a fire burning on the altar of Vesta.*Originally published by Hannah Humphrey in 1806 by James Gillray ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet,.***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders if close cut ***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £65 More than a passing resemblance to Margaret Thatcher ?


£85  Tinted


84. QUESTIONS AND COMMANDS; OR, THE MISTAKEN ROAD TO HEREFORD: A SUNDAY EVENING'S AMUSEMENT.
February 11th, 1788.
DUKE AND DUCHBSS OP GLOUCESTER. PRINCE WILLIAM OP GLOUCESTER. This appears to allude to some churchman seeking preferment through petticoat influence. The see of Hereford became vacant in 1788, and Butler, who had been collated to the see of Oxford, by his political friend and patron, Lord North, much against the will of the Oxonians, was about this period, translated to Hereford by the Pitt Ministry, it is said to appease the dissatisfaction of the University. It appears that Butler was a native of Hamburgh, and had never taken a degree in either of the English Universities. Hence the cold reception he met with at Oxford. . . .£55 unmounted Bohn edition *Originally published by Hannah Humphrey in 1806 by James Gillray ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet,.***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders if close cut ***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** post inclusive
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Pater Urbium A HINT TO MODERN SCULPTORS AS AN ORNAMENT TO A FUTURE SQUARE. May 3rd, 1796. PRINCE Of WALES.
A satirical portrait of the Prince, in the costume of his regiment, which he is supposed to be going to review. About this time it was in contemplation to erect statues in some of the squares of London*Originally published by Hannah Humphrey in 1806 by James Gillray ** Hand Coloured. Trimmed from a larger sheet,.***All shown with the margin against a darker carpet to show borders if close cut ***This is from the later Bohn Edition of 1849 to 1851 ** £45 post inclusive sold


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