Kathe Kollwitz. .

Due to size of some of these many will be sent rolled in a museum tube  and will flatten naturally if left flat,smaller items may be sent flat  Monogram to the rear of each sheet shown. If a number are bought the original portfolio is present and available for postage cost.






Tod (Death) Käthe Kollwitz Plate 5 from the Richter/Dresden Folio 1920

 An original print from Käthe Kollwitz from the Richter/Dresden Folio Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) was born in 1867 in Germany. She was surrounded by familial and social influences that affected her work as an artist. She was deeply moved by the human condition, and she repeatedly turned to the figure as a subject for her art. Kollwitz's family was very progressive: her grandfather actively opposed the state-supported church; her brother was a scientific socialist; and her parents themselves were also quite broad-minded. Kollwitz had always been moved by the working class. She had walked the streets of the city with her sister, especially watching the workers at the dock. She thoroughly enjoyed poems that her father would read to her about the workers. And once Kollwitz was married and her husband had a medical practice as a health insurance doctor for a clothing-workers' factory, she had the opportunity to get to know working citizens very well. Inevitably she became very interested in their lives. When Kollwitz did choose a subject for a print, she educated herself fully about the narrative and used the knowledge she acquired. Kollwitz often chose to depict mothers and seemed to prefer depicting women as opposed to men in her prints and drawings. Käthe Kollwitz became the first woman elected to the Prussian Academy but because of her beliefs, and her art, she was expelled from the academy in 1933. Harassed by the Nazi regime, Kollwitz's home was bombed in 1943. She was forbidden to exhibit, and her art was classified as "degenerate." Despite these events, Kollwitz remained in Berlin unlike artists such as Max Beckman and George Grosz who fled the country. She died in 1945. This work is based on an original by Käthe Kollwitz created in the early 1910's. This work is part of a portfolio of reproductions of early drawings of Käthe Kollwitz published by Richter in Dresden in 1920. The reproduction has a stamp verso showing an ER (Emil Richter) in a circle printed in a brownish colour. Käthe Kollwitz's selection of works for the so-called "Richter Portfolio" included an original lithograph and facsimile reproductions of 23 drawings and an early colour lithograph, all of which are printed on the same papers as the originals. The portfolio was edited by the by artist's publisher, Emil Richter, Dresden. The reproductions each bear on the back his oval stamp, the plaited initials "ERV".CONDITION old tape to rear or pic edge and creased corner be too!  £155 inc*


Abschied (Woman./Farewell) Käthe Kollwitz Plate 11 from the Richter/Dresden Folio 1920

 An original print from Käthe Kollwitz from the Richter/Dresden Folio Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) was born in 1867 in Germany. She was surrounded by familial and social influences that affected her work as an artist. She was deeply moved by the human condition, and she repeatedly turned to the figure as a subject for her art. Kollwitz's family was very progressive: her grandfather actively opposed the state-supported church; her brother was a scientific socialist; and her parents themselves were also quite broad-minded. Kollwitz had always been moved by the working class. She had walked the streets of the city with her sister, especially watching the workers at the dock. She thoroughly enjoyed poems that her father would read to her about the workers. And once Kollwitz was married and her husband had a medical practice as a health insurance doctor for a clothing-workers' factory, she had the opportunity to get to know working citizens very well. Inevitably she became very interested in their lives. When Kollwitz did choose a subject for a print, she educated herself fully about the narrative and used the knowledge she acquired. Kollwitz often chose to depict mothers and seemed to prefer depicting women as opposed to men in her prints and drawings. Käthe Kollwitz became the first woman elected to the Prussian Academy but because of her beliefs, and her art, she was expelled from the academy in 1933. Harassed by the Nazi regime, Kollwitz's home was bombed in 1943. She was forbidden to exhibit, and her art was classified as "degenerate." Despite these events, Kollwitz remained in Berlin unlike artists such as Max Beckman and George Grosz who fled the country. She died in 1945. This work is based on an original by Käthe Kollwitz created in the early 1910's. This work is part of a portfolio of reproductions of early drawings of Käthe Kollwitz published by Richter in Dresden in 1920. The reproduction has a stamp verso showing an ER (Emil Richter) in a circle printed in a brownish colour. Käthe Kollwitz's selection of works for the so-called "Richter Portfolio" included an original lithograph and facsimile reproductions of 23 drawings and an early colour lithograph, all of which are printed on the same papers as the originals. The portfolio was edited by the by artist's publisher, Emil Richter, Dresden. The reproductions each bear on the back his oval stamp, the plaited initials "ERV". £125 **



Babies/Blatt mit Kinderkoepfen Käthe Kollwitz Plate 14 from the Richter/Dresden Folio 1920


 An original print from Käthe Kollwitz from the Richter/Dresden Folio Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) was born in 1867 in Germany. She was surrounded by familial and social influences that affected her work as an artist. She was deeply moved by the human condition, and she repeatedly turned to the figure as a subject for her art. Kollwitz's family was very progressive: her grandfather actively opposed the state-supported church; her brother was a scientific socialist; and her parents themselves were also quite broad-minded. Kollwitz had always been moved by the working class. She had walked the streets of the city with her sister, especially watching the workers at the dock. She thoroughly enjoyed poems that her father would read to her about the workers. And once Kollwitz was married and her husband had a medical practice as a health insurance doctor for a clothing-workers' factory, she had the opportunity to get to know working citizens very well. Inevitably she became very interested in their lives. When Kollwitz did choose a subject for a print, she educated herself fully about the narrative and used the knowledge she acquired. Kollwitz often chose to depict mothers and seemed to prefer depicting women as opposed to men in her prints and drawings. Käthe Kollwitz became the first woman elected to the Prussian Academy but because of her beliefs, and her art, she was expelled from the academy in 1933. Harassed by the Nazi regime, Kollwitz's home was bombed in 1943. She was forbidden to exhibit, and her art was classified as "degenerate." Despite these events, Kollwitz remained in Berlin unlike artists such as Max Beckman and George Grosz who fled the country. She died in 1945. This work is based on an original by Käthe Kollwitz created in the early 1910's. This work is part of a portfolio of reproductions of early drawings of Käthe Kollwitz published by Richter in Dresden in 1920. The reproduction has a stamp verso showing an ER (Emil Richter) in a circle printed in a brownish colour. Käthe Kollwitz's selection of works for the so-called "Richter Portfolio" included an original lithograph and facsimile reproductions of 23 drawings and an early colour lithograph, all of which are printed on the same papers as the originals. The portfolio was edited by the by artist's publisher, Emil Richter, Dresden. The reproductions each bear on the back his oval stamp, the plaited initials "ERV".CONDITION age toning/ sun marking to 1 cm edge opposite signature ie left vertical edge .. £155**




Baby Käthe Kollwitz Plate 16 ffrom the Richter/Dresden Folio 1920

 An original print from Käthe Kollwitz from the Richter/Dresden Folio Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) was born in 1867 in Germany. She was surrounded by familial and social influences that affected her work as an artist. She was deeply moved by the human condition, and she repeatedly turned to the figure as a subject for her art. Kollwitz's family was very progressive: her grandfather actively opposed the state-supported church; her brother was a scientific socialist; and her parents themselves were also quite broad-minded. Kollwitz had always been moved by the working class. She had walked the streets of the city with her sister, especially watching the workers at the dock. She thoroughly enjoyed poems that her father would read to her about the workers. And once Kollwitz was married and her husband had a medical practice as a health insurance doctor for a clothing-workers' factory, she had the opportunity to get to know working citizens very well. Inevitably she became very interested in their lives. When Kollwitz did choose a subject for a print, she educated herself fully about the narrative and used the knowledge she acquired. Kollwitz often chose to depict mothers and seemed to prefer depicting women as opposed to men in her prints and drawings. Käthe Kollwitz became the first woman elected to the Prussian Academy but because of her beliefs, and her art, she was expelled from the academy in 1933. Harassed by the Nazi regime, Kollwitz's home was bombed in 1943. She was forbidden to exhibit, and her art was classified as "degenerate." Despite these events, Kollwitz remained in Berlin unlike artists such as Max Beckman and George Grosz who fled the country. She died in 1945. This work is based on an original by Käthe Kollwitz created in the early 1910's. This work is part of a portfolio of reproductions of early drawings of Käthe Kollwitz published by Richter in Dresden in 1920. The reproduction has a stamp verso showing an ER (Emil Richter) in a circle printed in a brownish colour. Käthe Kollwitz's selection of works for the so-called "Richter Portfolio" included an original lithograph and facsimile reproductions of 23 drawings and an early colour lithograph, all of which are printed on the same papers as the originals. The portfolio was edited by the by artist's publisher, Emil Richter, Dresden. The reproductions each bear on the back his oval stamp, the plaited initials "ERV".    CONDITION old tape to rear or pic edge and creased corner .. £125**



Nude from back Käthe Kollwitz Plate ? from the Richter/Dresden Folio 1920
 An original print from Käthe Kollwitz from the Richter/Dresden Folio Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) was born in 1867 in Germany. She was surrounded by familial and social influences that affected her work as an artist. She was deeply moved by the human condition, and she repeatedly turned to the figure as a subject for her art. Kollwitz's family was very progressive: her grandfather actively opposed the state-supported church; her brother was a scientific socialist; and her parents themselves were also quite broad-minded. Kollwitz had always been moved by the working class. She had walked the streets of the city with her sister, especially watching the workers at the dock. She thoroughly enjoyed poems that her father would read to her about the workers. And once Kollwitz was married and her husband had a medical practice as a health insurance doctor for a clothing-workers' factory, she had the opportunity to get to know working citizens very well. Inevitably she became very interested in their lives. When Kollwitz did choose a subject for a print, she educated herself fully about the narrative and used the knowledge she acquired. Kollwitz often chose to depict mothers and seemed to prefer depicting women as opposed to men in her prints and drawings. Käthe Kollwitz became the first woman elected to the Prussian Academy but because of her beliefs, and her art, she was expelled from the academy in 1933. Harassed by the Nazi regime, Kollwitz's home was bombed in 1943. She was forbidden to exhibit, and her art was classified as "degenerate." Despite these events, Kollwitz remained in Berlin unlike artists such as Max Beckman and George Grosz who fled the country. She died in 1945. This work is based on an original by Käthe Kollwitz created in the early 1910's. This work is part of a portfolio of reproductions of early drawings of Käthe Kollwitz published by Richter in Dresden in 1920. The reproduction has a stamp verso showing an ER (Emil Richter) in a circle printed in a brownish colour. Käthe Kollwitz's selection of works for the so-called "Richter Portfolio" included an original lithograph and facsimile reproductions of 23 drawings and an early colour lithograph, all of which are printed on the same papers as the originals. The portfolio was edited by the by artist's publisher, Emil Richter, Dresden. The reproductions each bear on the back his oval stamp, the plaited initials "ERV". CONDITION very little crinkling to top of sheet visible in pic of rear of print .. £185 **





Mother With Dead Child Käthe Kollwitz from the Richter/Dresden Folio 1920
 An original print from Käthe Kollwitz from the Richter/Dresden Folio Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) was born in 1867 in Germany. She was surrounded by familial and social influences that affected her work as an artist. She was deeply moved by the human condition, and she repeatedly turned to the figure as a subject for her art. Kollwitz's family was very progressive: her grandfather actively opposed the state-supported church; her brother was a scientific socialist; and her parents themselves were also quite broad-minded. Kollwitz had always been moved by the working class. She had walked the streets of the city with her sister, especially watching the workers at the dock. She thoroughly enjoyed poems that her father would read to her about the workers. And once Kollwitz was married and her husband had a medical practice as a health insurance doctor for a clothing-workers' factory, she had the opportunity to get to know working citizens very well. Inevitably she became very interested in their lives. When Kollwitz did choose a subject for a print, she educated herself fully about the narrative and used the knowledge she acquired. Kollwitz often chose to depict mothers and seemed to prefer depicting women as opposed to men in her prints and drawings. Käthe Kollwitz became the first woman elected to the Prussian Academy but because of her beliefs, and her art, she was expelled from the academy in 1933. Harassed by the Nazi regime, Kollwitz's home was bombed in 1943. She was forbidden to exhibit, and her art was classified as "degenerate." Despite these events, Kollwitz remained in Berlin unlike artists such as Max Beckman and George Grosz who fled the country. She died in 1945. This work is based on an original by Käthe Kollwitz created in the early 1910's. This work is part of a portfolio of reproductions of early drawings of Käthe Kollwitz published by Richter in Dresden in 1920. The reproduction has a stamp verso showing an ER (Emil Richter) in a circle printed in a brownish colour. Käthe Kollwitz's selection of works for the so-called "Richter Portfolio" included an original lithograph and facsimile reproductions of 23 drawings and an early colour lithograph, all of which are printed on the same papers as the originals. The portfolio was edited by the by artist's publisher, Emil Richter, Dresden. The reproductions each bear on the back his oval stamp, the plaited initials "ERV".CONDITION old tape to rear or pic top edge £125**



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